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Matt In Oklahoma
01-15-2011, 08:34 PM
The ability to save someone using basic first aid techniques has been really exemplified recently by the tragic events in Brazil, Australia and Arizona. If you have not had any or need a refresher now is the time. Even the most basic skills such as direct pressure have proven to be lifesavers. I have been honored to have saved several lives using CPR, heat casualty aid, direct pressure, drowning victim aid and cold exposure aid. If nothing else you may need to save your family or friend at some point, that in itself is enough to make it worthwhile and add to your preparations.
I can teach a monkey how to kill but real hero in my eyes are those who save others and my hats off to anyone who works in the field or has ever used the skills and courage to save someone.
Medical Skills are true Survival Skills.

ComputerGuy
01-16-2011, 03:03 AM
Finer words were never spoken. I had to deliver my son because the doc did not make it. First aid/ advanced buddy care are essential skills

eeyore
01-16-2011, 09:19 AM
Yep refresher is need for first aid,aed and cpr. I usually do mine through the American Red Cross http://www.redcross.org/portal/site/en/menuitem.d8aaecf214c576bf971e4cfe43181aa0/?vgnextoid=aea70c45f663b110VgnVCM10000089f0870aRCR D

Are there other alternatives? I have seen others but they are usually more expensive

Patriotic Sheepdog
01-20-2011, 07:24 AM
American Red Cross (ARC) is a good start and usually inexpensive. Taking an EMT course through your local Community College would be even better. This class will teach you skills that the ARC won't. It will also allow you to get real world exposure with "ride alongs" with your local fire department or ambulance service and probably the local E.R. You need to see real blood and real people in actual pain to see if you can handle it. I have taught many "macho men and women" that passed out when they had to take care of "bloody" situations. The EMT classes will also have more hands on training during class time then the ARC will in there limited class time.

As with anything, practicing what you learn is important to retain the skills.

Fido
01-20-2011, 10:27 AM
Well said P.S.
I would also recommend volunteering at the local rescue squad if you can. Most of them are eager to get the help, and the experience you will gain is priceless.
It is also a way to gain valuable insight into the human psyche and how they react to emergencies. This will help plan a little better for TEOTWAWKI.

Patriotic Sheepdog
01-20-2011, 02:42 PM
Agree Fido. Working with a VFD (volunteer fire depatrment) can get you training in many areas. Firefighting, rescue, emergency medical, hazardous materials, communications, etc.

One thing to know is you don't have to be "on the front line running into a burning building" to be part of a VFD. There are many areas that you could serve. When I was in a VFD years back, we had some men that would show up and direct traffic around the scene, and their wives would come along with coffee/tea and cookies and such. They weren't in good enough shape, or they just could not be on the front lines due to other issues. They would though, be there when training would occur and were in on many first aid and Haz Mat classes learning right along with the others.

biathlon
01-23-2011, 07:16 PM
Look here Matt.http://www.nsp.org/EduPrograms/emergencycare.aspx
This is required for all of us who patrol at Snowy Range. We get lots of patient contact and practice too.

Matt In Oklahoma
01-23-2011, 08:01 PM
Look here Matt.http://www.nsp.org/EduPrograms/emergencycare.aspxThis is required for all of us who patrol at Snowy Range. We get lots of patient contact and practice too.
Thats great! I am getting my 20yr old son in some courses this week. He helped me do CPR on the last one I did. Didn't work out so well but it really opened his eyes. The lady fell out at the resteraunt and at the time and when I jumped into it I had a cast on my arm at an angle. Guess what, you cant do compressions that way. I had my son come down and do them at my direction as I began the breathing portion. I was sorry that she didnt make it but proud of my son for his willingness and communications skills with me and his effort.
My daughter and I discussed this last week too. She has had CPR and Basic First Aid.
I see alot of people here on the forum I'm proud of!

EX121
01-24-2011, 02:54 PM
American Red Cross is offer a "new" Wilderness Remote (Delayed Care) first aid, it is a good class.

ippr123
03-22-2011, 03:33 AM
Really, first aid improves or saves the one's life. So it is very important in our life. the basic items in first aid kit are like tablets,water,food,blankets and list of phone numbers that will really help the people in emergency situations.

Patriotic Sheepdog
03-22-2011, 01:55 PM
Really, first aid improves or saves the one's life. So it is very important in our life. the basic items in first aid kit are like tablets,water,food,blankets and list of phone numbers that will really help the people in emergency situations.

The first aid kit only contains the tools to save someone's life. If you don't know what to do with those tools, the patient won't fare well. Those bandages won't jump on the wound, just like the bullet won't jump out the barrel without someones help.

Klayton
03-22-2011, 04:43 PM
Really, first aid improves or saves the one's life. So it is very important in our life. the basic items in first aid kit are like tablets,water,food,blankets and list of phone numbers that will really help the people in emergency situations.

Well those are some definite things you can put in a first aid kit, but I can live a few days without water, not too long if I am bleeding to death.

Those I would rather classify as EDC bag items or maybe your BOB. Basic first aid kits should include items that stop immediate loss of life, limb or eyesight. Think bandages, gauzes, some QuikClot, (if your skilled) IV solution and IV set, a set of EMT scissors, plastic (sucking chest wound), medic tape (clothe or synthetic), (if your skilled) a J-Tube, SAM (splint aluminum maleable), and a good number of cravats (handkerchiefs).

First Aid = We have a valid Airway? We have stopped the Bleeding? We have prevented shock (if trained)? Now we monitor for possible mouth-to-mouth or possible CPR until you arrive at a medical facility, or EMT arrive at your location.

But welcome to the forum ippr123, we always love others input and feel free to comment or ask pretty much anything here (nothing illegal mind you)..

Long Live the Republic!
~Klayton

IronShepherd
03-23-2011, 05:14 PM
The first aid kit only contains the tools to save someone's life. If you don't know what to do with those tools, the patient won't fare well. Those bandages won't jump on the wound, just like the bullet won't jump out the barrel without someones help.

Amen. I wish everybody would realize this.

mattkemp
05-04-2011, 12:14 PM
Very true . (http://www.lifemojo.com/lifestyle/first-aid-kit-7733138#ixzz1LOyAkOZG ) A first aid kit is a collection of supplies and equipment for use in giving first aid when an accident occurs. These include minor accidents like:

* Burns
* Cuts
* Abrasions (scrapes)

barfife
05-04-2011, 10:44 PM
My family is fortunate that I was both a LEO and an EMT when I wore a younger man's clothes. As an EMT in Atlanta, I got to treat gun shot wounds, knife wounds, heart attacks and deliver babies. I am now trying to pass along some of that knowledge to other family members should the old guy take a hit.

In our uncertain future, you may not have access to doctor, dentist or vet. You may be tasked with providing emergency medical or dental care for your family, deliver a baby and/or be the emergency vet for your pets/livestock. It is not a need to be taken lightly.

There are many free medical manuals on line and in our emergency medical forum. I urge each of you to download relative manuals, copy them on a zip drive to go in each B.O.B. and print a copy to place in loose leaf notebooks for your reference library.