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View Full Version : My Top 3 Survival Tools - What Are Yours?



Patriot Prepper
06-03-2011, 09:03 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKFHQU47r5I

This is a good mental exercise to think about the items you may want on your person or close by at all times. What are your top 3 survival tools?

Of course, we would not want to be in a survival situation with only three tools. But the question is a good mental exercise. And more importantly, having the three tools that I chose could save one

Matt In Oklahoma
06-03-2011, 09:12 AM
Probably the same 3
still looking for the "perfect" knife, fire steel, metal water container to boil it (still searching for the perfect one there too)

Irish-Tech
06-03-2011, 09:25 AM
when i get to thinking this way i have to go what i have me all the time. A Swiss army knife i always have on me not going to fight a bear with it, but i can do most of what i want. i also keep about 12 feet of 550 cord in one of my pockets, i can use that several different ways. then finally i always have a lighter near by. i do keep a bottle of water near, but that gets me to 4 and i would do with out it before the other 3.

Jerry D Young
06-03-2011, 04:11 PM
Swedish fire steel
Cold Steel Oda sheath knife
Guyot designs stainless steel water bottle.

Patriot Prepper
06-05-2011, 08:31 PM
Probably the same 3
still looking for the "perfect" knife, fire steel, metal water container to boil it (still searching for the perfect one there too)

I hear you and agree, there is no perfect knife, etc. In fact, many guys are still looking for the perfect women. Now that's a challenge.
Hey man, thanks for the input.

Patriot Prepper
06-05-2011, 08:32 PM
Swedish fire steel
Cold Steel Oda sheath knife
Guyot designs stainless steel water bottle.


Good choices. Sounds like we are on the same track.

Patriot Prepper
06-05-2011, 08:34 PM
when i get to thinking this way i have to go what i have me all the time. A Swiss army knife i always have on me not going to fight a bear with it, but i can do most of what i want. i also keep about 12 feet of 550 cord in one of my pockets, i can use that several different ways. then finally i always have a lighter near by. i do keep a bottle of water near, but that gets me to 4 and i would do with out it before the other 3.

The 550 cord is great stuff. It's always with me and excellent for survival uses. Thanks for the comment.

WiseOwl
06-05-2011, 09:08 PM
I also believe I could take these 3 items and be good on a hiking trip.....if I was Dual Man Vs Survivalin it....

My SOG Jungle Primitive
KATADYN HIKER PRO
Magnesium Striker Stick


All I need

Patriot Prepper
06-07-2011, 07:25 PM
I also believe I could take these 3 items and be good on a hiking trip.....if I was Dual Man Vs Survivalin it....

My SOG Jungle Primitive
KATADYN HIKER PRO
Magnesium Striker Stick


All I need

Excellent choices, they would also work for me. Thanks for the comment.

thereisnospoon
06-08-2011, 02:46 PM
I'm going to throw these out because I think they are the first three things I always have with me to help me survive; my body, my mind and my spirit.

My Body; if I keep it in relatively good shape, it should last me about 70+ years of good service.

My Mind; in almost any situation, if I keep my wits about me, I can use my brain to think my way out of lots of trouble.

My Spirit; if I am at peace, most things don't seem so catastrophic, as when I am in turmoil.

I also like a really good Glock 22 by my side along with my Gerber suspension and my Droid Phone...lots of apps for that baby.

Patriot Prepper
06-09-2011, 06:49 PM
I'm going to throw these out because I think they are the first three things I always have with me to help me survive; my body, my mind and my spirit.

My Body; if I keep it in relatively good shape, it should last me about 70+ years of good service.

My Mind; in almost any situation, if I keep my wits about me, I can use my brain to think my way out of lots of trouble.

My Spirit; if I am at peace, most things don't seem so catastrophic, as when I am in turmoil.

I also like a really good Glock 22 by my side along with my Gerber suspension and my Droid Phone...lots of apps for that baby.

Good advice. There are many people who do not keep in shape, lose their wits, and panic in an emergency. Survival requires the enactment of the best qualities of the body, mind, and spirit. Also, your Glock, Gerber, and Droid are nice items! Thanks for the cool comments.

Pop_45
07-20-2011, 05:09 PM
I’m bumping this thread because it is a good mental exercise.

First off I would want a water bottle with a built in filter, or one of the personal sized filtered straws. Having water is important, but having safe water is more important.

Secondly, I would want my Gerber multi tool. I can use it to make other tools. Like fire starters. Hand drill, and bow drill. Or make food gathering tools. Like bows, spears, Attila, digging sticks.

The third item was much harder to decide. First I thought about a sizable length of 550 cord. But with a little practice, I could make cordage. Then I thought about maybe an individual type mess kit. Like the Boy Scout mess kit. A lot of uses, from boiling water to using it as a shovel. But I think I know what I want in the kit for my third item. A good survival guide book with plant identification.

hua man
07-25-2011, 10:29 PM
My brain and two hands.

If I can't use my brain, I'll probably not last long anyway (concussion, hypothermia). I can use my brain and hands to make the tools I need. Anything extra is gravy.

brokedownbiker
07-27-2011, 01:47 AM
The top three that are ALWAYS attached to my belt

1) Leatherman Super tool 300,
2) Leatherman Monarch 400 light,
3) pocket kit w/ firestarter, paracord, emergency blanket

My BOB is usually within grabbing distance, too.

Jellyman
07-28-2011, 03:38 PM
Yes to bringing a clear head into a survival situation! I firmly believe that your attitude in crisis is first. After this a modicum of knowledge is very helpful, especially when applied with common sense. After that I would like a good knife to head up my list of tools. However, this list would dramatically change if it were me or other indivdual/s injured or lost in the woods and not a global SHTF situation. In this world of Satellites, an emergency shelter could be primary when used with e-PIRB, PLB, Sat Phone, or ever increasing cell phone coverage; all making help just hours away in the vast majority of emergency or survival situations.

Klingon
07-31-2011, 07:52 PM
Leatherman supertool, Katadyn hiker, Randall 14. These are my regular items for carry in the woods.
But one of my all time favorite tools is a pair of fence pliers. I keep one in every vehicle and in every tool kit. I don't carry 'em around hunting or hiking but I sure use 'em a lot.

kihnspiracy
08-16-2011, 02:43 AM
Swedish Steel, stainless water bottle, ESEE 5 knife.

Patriot Prepper
08-21-2011, 10:52 AM
I’m bumping this thread because it is a good mental exercise.

First off I would want a water bottle with a built in filter, or one of the personal sized filtered straws. Having water is important, but having safe water is more important.

Secondly, I would want my Gerber multi tool. I can use it to make other tools. Like fire starters. Hand drill, and bow drill. Or make food gathering tools. Like bows, spears, Attila, digging sticks.

The third item was much harder to decide. First I thought about a sizable length of 550 cord. But with a little practice, I could make cordage. Then I thought about maybe an individual type mess kit. Like the Boy Scout mess kit. A lot of uses, from boiling water to using it as a shovel. But I think I know what I want in the kit for my third item. A good survival guide book with plant identification.

It is a good mental exercise and I appreciate your response. Excellent choices. Whatever a person believes they can survive with, according to their skill level, is what they need. You obviously have survival skills, and know what works for you. I have several books with edible plant photos, and even with the books it can be difficult to identify some plants. Having a book would be nice.

snarlbuckle
08-22-2011, 12:43 PM
Here are my top three:

1) knife
2) Tarp
3) Paracord

Why don't I have a fire starter or water container on this list?

If you have a knife, you can find or make a water container of some sort out of plenty of materials that are laying around. You could even use part of the tarp to make a water jug.

As for fire starters, fire can be made by other means though it may be difficult. Also, everyone who smokes carries a fire starter with them at all times. My point is that because fire is used so often in our society, there are any number of ways to start a fire. You can find a way.

The combination of a knife, tarp, and paracord allows you to construct a long list of useful objects, sometimes using just what you find. Among those, you can make a bag with which to carry useful stuff that you find in your travels. Versatility is key. Also, if you are creative and good with your hands, all you need is tools and knowledge so that you can make everything you need.

Jeremiah2913
08-22-2011, 09:18 PM
leatherman charge
swamp rat chopweiler
spark-lite,

Jeremiah2913
08-22-2011, 09:25 PM
Here are my top three:

1) knife
2) Tarp
3) Paracord

Why don't I have a fire starter or water container on this list?

If you have a knife, you can find or make a water container of some sort out of plenty of materials that are laying around. You could even use part of the tarp to make a water jug.

As for fire starters, fire can be made by other means though it may be difficult. Also, everyone who smokes carries a fire starter with them at all times. My point is that because fire is used so often in our society, there are any number of ways to start a fire. You can find a way.

The combination of a knife, tarp, and paracord allows you to construct a long list of useful objects, sometimes using just what you find. Among those, you can make a bag with which to carry useful stuff that you find in your travels. Versatility is key. Also, if you are creative and good with your hands, all you need is tools and knowledge so that you can make everything you need.
Paracord is nice but by your own logic better can be made with the bark of trees depending on your area. In addition starting a fire in some parts even with a lighter can be extremely difficult let alone makeshift needs. I believe a good point to be made here is that not one set is necessarily better than another, if we don't consider our own surroundings we could make vital mistakes off of the majority.

Mjollnir
08-22-2011, 10:32 PM
1. Swiss Army Trekker
2. SS water bottle
3. Magnesium/flint bar

Patriot Prepper
08-29-2011, 08:53 PM
My brain and two hands.

If I can't use my brain, I'll probably not last long anyway (concussion, hypothermia). I can use my brain and hands to make the tools I need. Anything extra is gravy.

Yes, it is good to have primitive survival skills. In the event that a BOB is lost and you have no tools, you still have a chance at survival if you have skill. God gave us a brain and two hands, we need to use them and practice. Good points.

adoy
09-01-2011, 04:30 PM
Not 100% necessary but nice to have,, A couple of contractor garbage bags to round out the knife, firesteel, waterfilter list.

snarlbuckle
09-01-2011, 07:53 PM
Paracord is nice but by your own logic better can be made with the bark of trees depending on your area. In addition starting a fire in some parts even with a lighter can be extremely difficult let alone makeshift needs. I believe a good point to be made here is that not one set is necessarily better than another, if we don't consider our own surroundings we could make vital mistakes off of the majority.

This is very true. Depending on your location, building materials can be very easy to find. At the end of the day, I think the most important thing to have is determination. Beyond that, tools and building materials just make things easier.

jloneill17
09-16-2011, 11:03 AM
I'm assuming the water bottle has water in it. If so, I would have my Helle knife, my fire hawk, and my water bottle. if I have no water, then I substitute the bottle for my katadyn hiker pro. I'll pump the H2O right into my mouth.

RunAndGun
09-22-2011, 10:18 PM
Swiss Army Knife - Tinker Model
Pentagon Flashlight (used to be a Surefire Back up until it got stolen:( )
Canteen with Canteen Cup

I tried to get away from the military canteen when I started using hydration bladders but couldn't get away from the cup. The cup just is just so durn handy for every thing from mixing powders in your water to cooking. I wasn't saving any space by not using the canteen since it is virtually the same size and fits inside the cup, I figured I might as well carry the canteen with it. It then occurred to me that its only a matter of time before the hydration bladder gets punctured, without a back up for your water supply your sunk. Also, its a heck of allot easier to get water out of a canteen for your cooking, koolaid or coffee than a camelback.

Top
09-26-2011, 06:17 PM
My first reply on this forum. I like the idea of the thread but think that it is important to give thought to the environment that you will be operating in or possibly traveling through.

For example, in the urban environment my focus is on self protection, navigation and communication. I currently spend a lot of time in Atlanta visiting family.

My top three EDC

1. A 9mm pistol
2. Chris Reeve Sebenza
3. Verizon Droid 2

The first two go on as soon as I get out of bed and stay on until I go to bed at night. Then they are still attached to my pants at the side of my bed. The Droid is charging.

When I went to Alaska this summer the focus was on shelter and the ability to make water from snow. So a stove and cup would be high on the list.

In a swampy environment a mosquito net might end up being number one.

Just my $.02. FWIW.

Thanks,

Rick

daz
10-10-2011, 03:57 AM
I second everyone who says the environment you are in is the most important thing to consider when you are picking your three items.

My most likely location would be the west side of the cascade mountain range in the foot hills. Which is were I have live all my life, short though it may be. Around here the most common survival situation is getting hurt and or lost in the woods, and summer or winter the people who make it usually are suffering from hypothermia and the ones who do not usually died from it. So number one in this environment in my view is something to make fire. Keeps you warm, keeps you safe, draws help. As for which particular fire building tool I am not yet sure. Kind of new to all this.

For the second item it is a bit of a problem. Growing up I was expected by my father to have 3 things on my person, a pocket knife, a belt, and a comb. So I would normally choose a pocket Swiss army pocket knife. As it is a knife but so much more and has endless uses in a environment that is filled with things mechanical. Plus if I am not in bed, then as per Dad's training, it is in my pocket. But, I once spent a little time with some native people living in the jungle. The nearest road was a 8 hr hike or a 8 hr canoe trip. They had no electricity and not really any machinery. And every male from youth to old man had one tool. What do you think that tool was?
Well the nearest equivalent we have to it would be a machete, though theirs was a much more refined, effective and multipurpose tool than that. They cleared jungle with it, they planted crops with it and they peeled carrots for dinner with it. (Though the lady of the house we were staying at did get a nasty cut on her hand pealing carrots while I was there. They did keep them sharp!) Fact is I traded a axe for one.
So if I was in a woods survival situation I would trade my pocket knife gladly for a machete. You can make a shelter pretty fast with one in our environment as compared to with a pocket knife. Though no skinning knife it will certainly get the job done in a pinch. And unless going up against long range weapons, it is a pretty effective offensive and defensive weapon as the people of Rwandan could certainly testify.

For the third, after reading all the other post here, I think I would go with a small tarp. In protection against enemy number one, exposure, I think it would be a big help.

You may take issue with my choice of no water carrying tool or filter. But again it is environment. Though there is a risk to drinking unfiltered water, since I was a kid that is all we have ever done around here. And not that I couldn't get sick, but since I haven't yet, in a survival situation around here, it is certainly not the biggest risk. As for carrying water, around here it is very rare to be more than 1/2 mile from drinkable water. On the other hand if I was in Arizona, my first choice might well be a 5 gal bucket of water.

Any way that is my thoughts.

Patriot Prepper
10-16-2011, 11:24 AM
I second everyone who says the environment you are in is the most important thing to consider when you are picking your three items.

My most likely location would be the west side of the cascade mountain range in the foot hills. Which is were I have live all my life, short though it may be. Around here the most common survival situation is getting hurt and or lost in the woods, and summer or winter the people who make it usually are suffering from hypothermia and the ones who do not usually died from it. So number one in this environment in my view is something to make fire. Keeps you warm, keeps you safe, draws help. As for which particular fire building tool I am not yet sure. Kind of new to all this.

For the second item it is a bit of a problem. Growing up I was expected by my father to have 3 things on my person, a pocket knife, a belt, and a comb. So I would normally choose a pocket Swiss army pocket knife. As it is a knife but so much more and has endless uses in a environment that is filled with things mechanical. Plus if I am not in bed, then as per Dad's training, it is in my pocket. But, I once spent a little time with some native people living in the jungle. The nearest road was a 8 hr hike or a 8 hr canoe trip. They had no electricity and not really any machinery. And every male from youth to old man had one tool. What do you think that tool was?
Well the nearest equivalent we have to it would be a machete, though theirs was a much more refined, effective and multipurpose tool than that. They cleared jungle with it, they planted crops with it and they peeled carrots for dinner with it. (Though the lady of the house we were staying at did get a nasty cut on her hand pealing carrots while I was there. They did keep them sharp!) Fact is I traded a axe for one.
So if I was in a woods survival situation I would trade my pocket knife gladly for a machete. You can make a shelter pretty fast with one in our environment as compared to with a pocket knife. Though no skinning knife it will certainly get the job done in a pinch. And unless going up against long range weapons, it is a pretty effective offensive and defensive weapon as the people of Rwandan could certainly testify.

For the third, after reading all the other post here, I think I would go with a small tarp. In protection against enemy number one, exposure, I think it would be a big help.

You may take issue with my choice of no water carrying tool or filter. But again it is environment. Though there is a risk to drinking unfiltered water, since I was a kid that is all we have ever done around here. And not that I couldn't get sick, but since I haven't yet, in a survival situation around here, it is certainly not the biggest risk. As for carrying water, around here it is very rare to be more than 1/2 mile from drinkable water. On the other hand if I was in Arizona, my first choice might well be a 5 gal bucket of water.

Any way that is my thoughts.

Good points. I also think a machete is an excellent tool. I live in SouthFlorida and out here, machetes are extremely useful. I own at least 5 of them. I used to maintain my property (now I pay someone) and would use a machete every week to clear away unwanted growth. A machete is also a great close range weapon and can take off a hand or arm. My bug out locations, however, are outside of Florida and in a woodland environment. There a machete would work, but I prefer the Cold Steel in a wooodland environment. I think it is a little more versitile than a machete.

By the way, I think your dad is a pretty smart guy. As a kid, I too, always had a knife in my pocket. I had a whole collection of knives, baynettes, and swords. My knives were just pocket knives, boyscout knives, and swiss army knives. Thanks for the imput.

Grinnan Barrett
10-16-2011, 04:33 PM
I want a USA made Multitool I have some old ones from Gerber and Leatherman both.
A really good compass signal mirror combo (Silva makes a nice one)
A Katadyn Mini (Size is really nice and easy to use.)

Patriot Prepper
10-22-2011, 08:28 AM
Swiss Army Knife - Tinker Model
Pentagon Flashlight (used to be a Surefire Back up until it got stolen:( )
Canteen with Canteen Cup

I tried to get away from the military canteen when I started using hydration bladders but couldn't get away from the cup. The cup just is just so durn handy for every thing from mixing powders in your water to cooking. I wasn't saving any space by not using the canteen since it is virtually the same size and fits inside the cup, I figured I might as well carry the canteen with it. It then occurred to me that its only a matter of time before the hydration bladder gets punctured, without a back up for your water supply your sunk. Also, its a heck of allot easier to get water out of a canteen for your cooking, koolaid or coffee than a camelback.

I agree with you RunAndGun. I love camelback and use them backpacking etc. However, if given a choice of a camelback and a metal water bottle, or a canteen and a metal cup, I will take the latter and forget the camelback. With a military canteen and a metal cup, you can carry water and also cook. Can't do that with a camelback. Like I said, I do love camelback and use them all the time. Just not as useful under this test scenereo. Thanks for the input.

Swordarm4
10-22-2011, 11:22 PM
My tomahawk , striker , and mess kit.

Patriot Prepper
11-29-2011, 05:13 PM
My tomahawk , striker , and mess kit.

I do love tomahawks. They are underestimated and if used right can be awesome defense weapons. I think a knife is a little more versatile, that's why I choose it. But tomahawks are really cool.