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  1. #1

    A simple starter workout

    For those of us just getting started or started back on physical training, consider this workout.

    Stretch first- maybe some of our medical gurus can post with a good stretching regimen. I know what works for me but it's hard to describe each stretch and they may not be the best.

    10 pushups, go slow and make sure your breathing through each one
    20 situps, have someone hold your legs or wedge them under a couch, bed, etc.

    Stand with your feet flat and back straight. Slowly, with breathing squat down keeping your back straight and your feet on the ground. Start with 5 of these.

    Remember to breath through each exercise, deep breathes in and out.

    Walk 1 mile briskly.

    This ought to be a good starter workout, do this for a week or so and then start adding to it.

    It's a good way to get started. Good luck!
    Lowdown3

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  2. #2
    Super Moderator Patriotic Sheepdog's Avatar
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    It's hard to describe the stretches that should be done before and after a workout but I found some good pics online. All major muscle groups and some minor ones should be stretched for flexibility and to help reduce injury during your workout. It is best if you could hold each stretch for about 10-30 seconds depending on muscle group. It may be uncomfortable but shouldn't cause pain.

    Here is a website that shows some good stretches and discriptions.
    Upper Body: http://tomsfitnessguide.com/upper-bo...exercises.html

    Lower Body: http://tomsfitnessguide.com/lower-bo...exercises.html

    Hope this helps...
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  3. #3
    EXCELLENT! Thank you!

    It's important to start slow when beginning any workout, especially if it's been a few years since you've really been active.

    I regularly work with a lot of guys younger than me, and I watch them do some really stupid stuff physically that they will end up regretting later in life- sparing with fresh injuries, etc.

    A LITTLE discomfort is your body's way of telling you "I told you so, you should not have sat on the couch for five years." But a lot of real PAIN is a different story. So be sure to start slow.

    "Physical" preps include more than just beans and rice, your body needs to be able to function well under stress. Only regular activities will help you get to that point.

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  4. #4
    Watch the Olympics. Rarely do you see someone stretching BEFORE activity (cold muscles are prone to injury). Instead focus on a nice easy warmup - get the blood flowing throughout the muscle. Stretching is VITAL AFTER exercise. As the muscle fibers have been firing (contracting), there is reduced relaxation (that's why you looked "pumped up" after weight-activity - even body weight, i.e pushups). Stretching allows the muscles fibers to relax, joints to remain flexible, and, as an added bonus, less soreness the following day as lactic acid is released out of the muscle.

    SUMMARY - before exercise activity - WARMUP. After exercise activity - STRETCH (no bouncing, just breathe out allowing the body's muscles to relax)

  5. #5
    Just as a test case, my family started doing a similar workout today prior to running. We started with 15 pushups, 30 situps, 10 air squats and 10 burpees then went right into our run. The family said the burpees were probably the most taxing, course we did them after the air squats also.

    Get out and give it a try, it's not too tough!

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  6. #6

    I concur with wheelsee

    I strongly agree with wheelsee about NOT stretching before your workout. As a marathon runner and mountain climber, I know quite well the benefits of stretching. If you are going to stretch before your workout, do it VERY lightly and don't hold the stretch very long. A good warm-up before the workout is the way to go. That being said, thoroughly stretching after your workout is the key to health.

    If you could watch the runners or other athletes in the Olympics 30 minutes before their workout, you would see them slowly warming up, and maybe doing a few light stretches.

  7. #7
    Actually stretching before and AFTER exercising is essential. You dont see olympians stretching because they do this when the camera is off them, and wear their warm up suits to keep their muscles warm and ready. =)

    Prior to an exercise stretches should be SHORT no more than 10 seconds. This does two main things 1) preps the muscle for work (kind of a wake up call) 2) stretching a muscle also helps to activate the muscle and deermines the ratio of which muscle fibers are used. White fibers are your reflex fast snapping movements, red fibers are your slow heavy lifting fibers.
    After a workout you should thoroughly stretch the muscles worked. This builds your flexibility and has a lower chance of over stretching (muscle can be torn during stretching, as well as the muscle tendon connection). After workout strech should last 30 seconds, to increase flexibility.

    So your workout sequence should be: calesthetics (jumping jacks, running in place, even low count girl pushups to warm up chest and arm muscles) your pre workout stretch (10 second stretches) your workout (most studies say 20 min minimum for aerobic exercises) cooldown stretches (30 second stretches to build flexibility) It is important if you did aerobic workout do not drop your head below your heart while stretching, and bounce back up too quickly, best rule is never drop head below heart during cooldown-prevents blackouts.

    Hope this helps everybody.
    OH, you want to see stretches BEFORE a workout? Watch a rodeo rider. I seen one stretch for 15 minutes for his 8 second ride! =)

  8. #8
    OH, thought of one more "basic" muscle group often overlooked. Biceps & Lats! Why? Well, you barely use your pushup muscles (pusing away muscles) compared to our bicep & lats (pulling and holding towards you muscles). Your choice, you can do simple bicep curls for starter (curling old 1gal milk jugs filled with water=8lbs) or you can do pull-ups (this works both biceps and lats).

    I always thought the Army was foolish in their push-up only muscle group training, and it showed every time we did a forced road march or had to set up GP medium and larges. Needless to say, the females were almost useless in this heavy lifting (not bashing them-just the facts) and most of the "300" men were 120lb punks I could knock out in one punch, and they were almost useless as well when it came to "work". Needless to say I always got stuck humping the 60, one of the ones not helped on my side of the center beam when erecting the tents, etc.

    We have two major muscle roles, push (punch) away from us, and pull (hold) towards us. We need to work BOTH!

    Summary: add some bicep curls or chin-ups

  9. #9
    My wife has gotten me interested in burst exercise that Dr. Mercola emphasizes -
    Do an exercise really fast 30 seconds (running in place, pushups, etc. to get your heart racing); rest 1 1/2 mins., then repeat for up to 8 sets a day
    Need a heart rate that is (222 minus your age). This promotes HDH - hormone for longevity.
    Also do a set of weights (just not the same muscles 2 days in a row). Take in a protein drink after exercise or a low carb meal (if at risk for diabetes).
    Are some tips on burst exercises online.

  10. #10
    oktheniknow, Burst exercises are awesome! I used to work out with a couple of body builders (close to turning pro) that did SOME burst exercises in the middle or towards the end of the workout. READ: AFTER thoroughly warmed up. WE did them quite a lot on bigger muscle groups. But we also did a lot of very slow deep weight lifting (Which is awesome for building a full range of true strength in that particular muscle). Burst exercises are quite affective at building fast twitch muscle and adding muscle size... But the are kinda dangerous. And they hurt. Do them with caution!

    Bodybuilders are amazing in that they know how to use exactly the right tools to get the results they need. The good one's are extremely disciplined in everything they do. And they have really healthy diets (when dieting). They are incredibly interesting specimens (I mean the one's who are serious enough to compete), they do however have it all wrong when it comes to overall health and strength. What happens if a 200lb bodybuilder had to hike 8 miles? Or heaven forbid, RUN? Or what happens if a 150lb man can't lift an 80lb pack? It seems to me, that the true thriving survivor would have a healthy dose of strength, toughness, and endurance. All three make up a well rounded individual that would have a good all around chance at surviving.

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