FLIR Thermosight Pro 536 Current Specials HALO Medical Supplies
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg B. View Post
    Wolfbrother,
    First, thanks for the post and inspiration.

    Second; Could this be prepared in the "wild", so to speak? I mean could it be made in a camp setting?
    I've never tried it. It's water, salt, flour, and baking. If you have a camp oven - I suspect yes. If you're good with Dutch ovens, I suspect yes.
    WolfBrother

    Most people are content to be a part of the Good Shepherds flock.
    Some people choose to prey on the sheep.
    Some people live to defend the Good Shepherds flock and to confront the Wolf.
    I am a Sheep Dog.

  2. #12
    Gus14
    Guest
    Being a lifelong Civil War reenactor and having attended many Mountain Man redezvous I concider myself knowledgable in the ways of the hard tack.
    To answer a few questions,
    You want the smaller squares and not one big hard tack because you dont want moisture in the biscuit. That is what will make it spoil. As long as there is no moisture in it, it will keep for years.
    Hard tack is easily made in a dutch oven. It is just a little labor inensive because you want the dutch hot enough to bake it slowly without burning it. A lot of checking goes into the baking process.
    A common recipe to make a filling meal out of meager rations (dried meat and hard tack): Take yer metal cup and fill it with water. Drop in your dried meat and let it simmer over the fire. Once the meat reconstitutes and starts to fall apart, toss in any edible vegitation you may scrounge up and add in any spices you may have. Then drop in your hardtack. Allow the tack to soak up the broth and enjoy. Depending on what you have available to add, this is sometimes a really great soup. I added some red cabbage and turnips and it was really good.

    History plays a key roll in my preps. People lived for thousands of years before canned goods, vacuum packing, MRE's and freeze dried foods. Armies were fed with basic items and they moved freely all over the earth. Take their experiences and apply them to today with the modern conveniences like ziplock bags, tupperware, electric ovens, dehydrators, smokers, climate controled homes for storage, etc. Their errors and successes is our free education on what to do or what we could do to stay fed if the need arises.
    Last edited by Gus14; 02-01-2013 at 02:01 PM.

  3. #13
    This is still being made commercially. I consider it Newfie Soul Food, along with salt Cod.
    http://www.tidespoint.com/food/hard_bread.shtml
    This is the real deal, and I try to eat it every other month or so. The bags I have are going on 5 years old, and are still good, with no special packaging.Look on the websitre for cooking recipes.

    Regards,
    Templar
    Salutations,
    Templar

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________

    There are very good reasons why we all are gathered here...

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg B. View Post
    Wolfbrother,
    First, thanks for the post and inspiration.

    Second; Could this be prepared in the "wild", so to speak? I mean could it be made in a camp setting?
    Apologies for the long time between answers - life has been interesting the past few years.

    To answer your "prepared" in the wild - Best Guess - yes - you'd need a reflector oven or other way to cook it.
    WolfBrother

    Most people are content to be a part of the Good Shepherds flock.
    Some people choose to prey on the sheep.
    Some people live to defend the Good Shepherds flock and to confront the Wolf.
    I am a Sheep Dog.

  5. #15
    To start off I'm not Jewish, so I'm no expert. Not that it matters. But over the years I have known a lot of them and camped, hunted ,ate, fought, with a lot of ethnic folks, and I have been exposed to the food. If you can get Matzo crackers/bread it is just like the crackers from the 50"s CD cans. They are used like bread/crackers. You can get them at a ethnic store in boxes bags and cans that are sealed tight. They are cheap. I think they taste much like the hard tack I have eaten in a couple country's , I would rather have Club or saltines my self but they will last.

  6. #16
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The land that winter forgot
    Posts
    183
    Top with some MRE apple jelly - it's the bomb!

  7. #17
    Manufacturer of Hater-Aide Mannlicher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    North Central FL
    Posts
    316
    British Navy was fairly expert at making hard tack, or ship's biscuits. A small batch of authentic product can be made with 4 cups flour, a tsp of salt, and 1 to 1 and a half cups water.
    Make the dough, roll out 1/2 inch thick, cut into 2 inch squares, dock with a fork, and bake at 325F for an hour.
    Before rolling out, the dough needs to be beaten with a stick, or run through a pasta machine many times. This forces the flour to take the water.

  8. #18
    the problem with the long storage of Matzo crackers/bread is that all the recipes that I could find had olive oil and any fat addition shortens the storage life.

  9. #19
    230 You might be right on that, what about the basic mix, sealed, do you think that would spoil? The cd crackers are still ok after 70 years in the can. And I have had matzo from cans, Your thoughts.

  10. #20
    I found the ingredients on a can of survival crackers from the 1970s.
    Suhuze & Burch Biscuit company: wheat and corn flour, corn sugar, shortening, salt, leavening and a boat load of preservatives. Must be the preservatives?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •