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  1. #11
    Mustache Afficianado WiseOwl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by protus View Post
    cant even fart at the bear with out the GFC fast roping in to my windows for a 3am no knock warrant for " wild life harassment...." LOL.

    just gotta shore up the line and just report each time he tears something up

    Hire you some skunks and bees to guard the trash....lol......or make a trash pen using barbwire that you can easily remove or open a gate...or make a "bear bag" hanging trash bin.....

    I used to have dogs do that crap to my trash and I started bb gunnin em, after a while, they quit coming because that rear end was full of copper.
    You know what ol' Jack Burton always says at a time like this?

  2. #12
    I moved to the country about six years ago. We are actually not that far out of town anymore due to town sprawling out . We are not in a desolate area, there are several neighbors within site of my place. I purchased aprox. 30 acres which is basically behind all of my neghbors. Most of my friends, family , and co-workers are in town. They regulary call or ask if I am avalible for various activities ( stop and have a beer after work kinda stuff ) because they have no idea about the amount of time that I spend working around here. It is a diffrent lifestyle, it does consume your time and mind too. I do garden, raise chickens, and keep up alot of property. I have alot of plans and ideas as far as expanding a natural spring that I have to digging root cellars to security, The list goes on. It always keeps my wheels turning so to speak. But there is only so many hours in the day. It takes a diffrent mindset to manage and arrange your life around the country lifestyle. Yes there are rewards, but most of them take hard work to realize. Cutting the grass around here entails a z-cut mower and a tractor with a finishing mower along with about 4 hours of your life. That is weekly maintenance. Three times a year it takes a bushog and a entire weekend. Not to mention keeping up the 8 acres of forrest that requires more of my attention than you could imagine.I am not complaining or sorry that I am here , just passing along some well earned wisdom.

  3. #13
    protus...
    this is great!!
    congratulations..
    i'm still in a high rise apartment!
    lol
    sounds to me like you need to go check out the tractor thread... i think you need one.
    rr

  4. #14
    Administrator protus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockriver View Post
    protus...
    this is great!!
    congratulations..
    i'm still in a high rise apartment!
    lol
    sounds to me like you need to go check out the tractor thread... i think you need one.
    rr
    now ya sound like my kid when she sees the john deere mowers at lowes lol
    Hey Petunia...you dropped your man pad!

  5. #15
    congrats protus,place sounds great..i myself bought 5 acres down in missouri back in march this year and will be making the move next month. I hated to,but i bit the bullet and borrowed the $$ for it but presently doubling up on pmts for faster payoff..hope all my preppin friends get the homestead/retreat of their dream
    I HAD RATHER HAVE 12 HONEST PEOPLE JUDGING ME,AS TO HAVE 6 CARRYING ME...

  6. #16
    Congratulations Protus, Sounds like you have many opportunities ahead. We made the move back in '94 when I leased 125 acres in the county where we live now. I quickly realized that was too much for me and the family. It was good to be able to raise some cattle, which we did and also hunt on, but still working full time and trying to do what was required was difficult. We bought 40 acres after that in '96 and have been here since. It was like homesteading, land had never been occuppied until we move on it.

    Keep us updated with your progress, we all can learn from each other and enjoy reading about the adventures. I had 22 acres cut for pulpwood and then rented I backhoes and track loaders to de-stump it and turn it into pasture. Great thing about that is my wife learned to run a back hoe and enjoyed doing it so when I was able to buy one, I actually got encouragement. Now we have 2 tractors, horses, goats, chickens, cows and a big garden, but none of happened over night and there is still so much I plan to do I will never not be busy, but I wouldn't like it any other way.

    Just remember, try to enjoy all that you do. Somethings will try your patience, but it's your's and you're doing it for you. I learned many years ago to never say never, but I don't ever think I could live in town again.

  7. #17
    protus,
    i drool every time we go into lowe's...
    i understand...

    when my friend bought his little acreage the first thing he did was buy a 10 year old riding mower..
    it lasted about 1 season, with lots of repair in that time frame. it sits now... broke..
    --
    he also obtained a 30 year old john deere compact tractor. price was just a little more than the john deere lawn tractors (the better grades)
    that you get at the jd dealer.
    there is no comparison... it runs forever on diesel. drags trees. pulls a 72" mower, operates a big tiller, and he runs it hard.
    there are many other examples in the tractor thread.. for just a "few dollars more" you can get a whole lot more than just a lawnmower..
    and implements can be had "used" that will work well. lots of farmers have small implements they used to farm with out behind the barn.

    i'm proud for you...
    tell us the stories as they occur. it will be a huge educational thing for me.

  8. #18
    Veteran of Valor and all around awesome guy!
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    The "country lifestyle" is not what most city folks imagine. We made our move to the country in 1996, rented for a couple of years to make sure it was what we wanted, then bought our place in 1999.
    It was originally part of a tree farm with pines planted 12 X 6 - rows 12 feet apart, trees every 6 feet down the row, like corn.
    The wife and i literally hewed our homestead out, mainly with hand tools. We left a little over an acre at the back that butts up to more woods for my "meditation area".
    Even today, after clearing, running fence, building barns, stables, sheds, chicken coops, etc it is a full time job just to keep even. The wife stays home, I'm fortunate enough to still be gainfully employed (with a 72 mile round trip every day).
    Our road is dirt, nearest hospital is in another state, nearest mall is an hour away, cops do not regularly come out this far, fire dept can be here in maybe 10 minutes (if they are not already busy).
    All sorts of wild life right outside the back door (some of which are looking for the chicken buffet).
    And you know what? We love it, wouldn't have it any other way. The wife and I both agree if the county ever paves our road that means civilization is getting waaaay to close and we need to move further out.
    Protus, you will love it!

    All the advertising for detergents, etc, that touts that "country fresh" smell obviously didn't take cows into consideration.
    "There is nothing so exhilarating as to be shot at without result." Winston Churchill
    Member: Veterans of Foreign Wars, Vietnam Veterans of America, American Legion, AMVETS, Society of the Fifth Infantry Division

  9. #19
    CAPSTONE MEMBER 610Alpha's Avatar
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    Love the thread and hearing from everyone's perspective and how everyone's situation is different even in the country.

    I would like to offer some thoughts and experiences and some questions. My step-dad has a couple hundred acres of farm ground and 20-40 acres of pasture/woods. He mows only what he absolutely has to which is the yard of about 1 acre. The pasture area which hasn't had cattle in it for several years does not get mowed.

    Question - Why are you mowing? No response needed but to think about what you are mowing and why? Is it necessary and/or could it be given to livestock to graze upon thereby giving you time back?

    My step-dad does 0 to his forrest. He lets nature take care of it unless it falls on a fence or structure. He doesn't heat his home with wood. He used to heat it with coal that he got from the coal mine that he worked at on 3rd shift. He farmed 1st shift. Unless you are heating your home with wood or powering a wood gasifier or both it shouldn't take that much time to let nature take its course. Now if you are getting heat/power from wood then like 1Admin said the reason they have a log splitter is to save time.

    Not saying what anyone is doing is right or wrong just want you to think about why you are doing what you are doing and is there a way that it can be done to save you time. Ask yourself why several times to get to the root. Make sure that it is worth your time to be doing, that is the most precious of commodities that we all have.

    Take time to plan out your feeding and watering of your livestock so that you can get more done with your time. Maybe do some Farmer Engineering to make it less time consuming

    I setup my raised bed garden with pvc sprinkler system so I wouldn't have to stand there with a hose. I do have to turn it on but next year I am getting a timer for it. All I'll have to do is make sure that the batteries are working and obviously turn on the water .

    Talk to some old people that grew up on farms to hear what they did to save time. Granted my step-dad hasn't had chickens and such on his farm since he was a young man but through his adult life he worked 3rd shift at the coal mine and farmed/raised cattle during the day. He still had time to drink coffee with his neighbors, go mushrooming, and eat blackberry pie .

    My FIL has about 10 acres and wishes he had done this or that differently...so take the time to plan out your homestead to avoid re-work...go visit some farms to get ideas and ask them what they wish they had done differently. Take some time on the front end to do some research. Proper Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance.

    Protus - I appreciate you sharing your experience and growing pains...good luck with da bear. Maybe if the GFC get enough complaints they will move said bear to a better location or not.
    Last edited by 610Alpha; 09-17-2012 at 11:42 AM.
    "It's a trap!!!!" -- Admiral Ackbar

  10. #20
    Veteran of Valor and all around awesome guy!
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    The beauty of having horses is they mow and fertilize at the same time.
    "There is nothing so exhilarating as to be shot at without result." Winston Churchill
    Member: Veterans of Foreign Wars, Vietnam Veterans of America, American Legion, AMVETS, Society of the Fifth Infantry Division

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