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  1. #1

    Heating and cooking options

    Most of us are considering multiple "layers" to handle these problems. Initially it might be as simple as a firestarter and a dutch oven. Later it may move into more long term solutions.

    Many are against wood because of the smoke and smell. Properly seasoned wood gives off little of either.

    LP gas for cooking and even heating is one option. LP stores well, tanks can be buried. Tanks should always be purchased versus leased. You have no control over the price per gallon you pay with a leased tank, as you cannot "shop around" to get the best price with a leased tank, you must use the company that you lease from.

    We purchased our tank well over a decade ago. Many many years later we started getting a BILL for "leasing" of the tank from the major gas company that we bought the tank from! After digging and digging we found the original receipt, called the local office, got a "I can't help you" stonewall. Then we made copies and sent certified mail to the company headquarters of this Feral dog company Finally they recanted and said yes you actually do own that tank you purchased from us.... Well gee thanks!!! That's happened to at least three other people we know. Moral of the story, be sure to keep your receipt of sale!!!

    An LP tank causes some tactical dilemmas for the survivalist. If the tank cannot be buried, it should otherwise be reinforced to protect it against ballistic intrusion....

    Yet one day, the LP will run out. The one time we ran our tank dry we looked back and it was over 3 years since our last fill. And I like really hot water baths

    Wood is probably the best long term solution *for us*. Keep in mind we live in an area with an abundance of timber and I love to cut wood.

    The last couple years we have been updating some of our stoves and we purchased a Vermont BunBaker stove. It's a space heater, it's baking oven, it's got a large cooktop and you can order it with a H20 heater as well.

    http://www.jrhenterprises.com/produc...&categoryId=18

    So far, it hasn't been cool enough yet to really give it a good go, but we did burn a fire after we installed it to make sure everything was pulling fine.

    Attachment 1506

    Bunbaker 002.jpg

    DON'T MAKE THE SAME MISTAKE I DID!!!! I ordered ours WITHOUT the water heater! I guess I figured I could add this on later, I screwed up.

    Other options we have been using for years now include these Waterford Parlor Stoves-

    A Waterford "Erin" that served as our only heat source for years before we added on to our house a few years ago-

    Attachment 1507
    016.jpg

    And a Waterford "Leprechaun" (they are made in Ireland...I didn't name it )


    017.jpg

    Long story but the Leprechaun was originally never needed and never installed in the original part of the house. The Erin more than heated the whole house (1,200 sq. feet then).
    In the original hoo ha of getting the thing, having it in storage for almost a year before it was originally going to be installed, etc. several key components of the stove came up missing. Unfortunately this was not realized till much later. One of the items missing was the removable top plate. Replacement cost today for that piece was $240.!!! Original purchase price of the Lephrecaun was $900'ish back in the day.... So you know their was no way I was going to drop $240. on a small piece of metal for it.

    What to do what to do..... I postulated that since the stoves are cast iron, why couldn't we take a piece of cast iron cookware of similar circumference and use that? The Kat found a piece of cast iron cookware we maybe have used once in 15 years. I took the handle off with a metal chop saw and spent about 5 minutes grinding it down to fit. That's why you see these little piece shaped indentions

    018.jpg018.jpg

    Eventually we plan to add some active solar heating collectors to the mix for part of the heating equation also, probably a "Sunsheet" type model. The house and the addition is already setup for passive solar with lots of south facing windows, thermal mass, decent overhang, deciduous tree cover for summer, etc.

    Properly stored, we have seen firewood that was cut and brought up to the hunting camp about a decade ago last and burn well. Ours at home never lasts that long though

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    "Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed..."

  2. #2
    Administrator protus's Avatar
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    great looking stoves. you mean you never tried scraping out corn bread from a pan like that LMAO.

    Even though we dont have our stove/fireplace issue resolved at casa de protus yet we've been collecting wood as we go for when it is. We got a cast iron fire pit ( for free my kinda deal) which now gives us a "fire" outside besides the smoker/grill. So cooking wise we are good to go ( 2 coleman white gas stoves, the above pit, smoker/grill) on "heating" we are lacking luckily though weather here isnt as bad as further north.
    Right now its 65f inside my house but we left all the windows open the last few days with the cooler weather.We may have to just tuff it out this winter till we get a stove installed.
    Ive thought of making the window boxes on the south side of the house but dunno how'd they'd do honestly.
    Hey Petunia...you dropped your man pad!

  3. #3
    Lowes in our area is carrying some nice free standing stoves now. That one at the hunting camp has worked out well over the years and was priced right at $150. You could line it with firebrick also to probably help hold heat through the night- I don't know why we never did that....
    Boris- "He's famous, has picture on three dollar bill!"

    Rocky- "Wow! I've never even seen a three dollar bill!"

    Boris- "Is it my fault your poor?"

  4. #4
    Site Supporter 2011 EX121's Avatar
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    Just a bit off topic, check with your state version of the EPA, some are buying older wood stoves to help improve air quality. I know locally there is a one time deal for the first xxx number, and it isn't much. However if you've been thinking about upgrading it may help.
    We use wood as a back-up and have 2 small propane camp stoves & several backpacking stoves for cooking.
    Survival question. What do I need most, right now?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Admin View Post
    Lowes in our area is carrying some nice free standing stoves now. That one at the hunting camp has worked out well over the years and was priced right at $150. You could line it with firebrick also to probably help hold heat through the night- I don't know why we never did that....
    i actaully thought of doing that more or less setting a stove in pace,then blocking it in. aka a pizza oven more or less. Only issue on my end is making sure the structure will hold the temp's with out turning me and the family into BBQ LOL.
    Hey Petunia...you dropped your man pad!

  6. #6
    We've been looking at basic woodstoves as an alternative heat and cooking source. The cheapest we'd seen as of yesterday was at Atwoods for $599.00. We went to one of our favorite haunts called, The Emporium. It's an antique store. I ran across a nice Longwood wood stove in one of the booths. I did a double take when I saw the price was only $95.00! Sold! We're picking it up Tuesday and installing it in the fireplace. It has two eyes on top and should put out plenty of heat for us.

    We also have a propane grill with a back-up tank, a charcoal grill and a fire pit. We're working on cutting a ton of wood to keep us going indefinately. Admin. mentioned lining one with firebricks. Good thought!
    Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children's children what it was once like in the United States where men were free.

    Ronald Wilson Reagan (1911-2004)

    JOSEPH WAS A PREPPER!
    NOAH WAS A PREPPER!
    I'M A PREPPER TOO!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by 1Admin View Post
    Lowes in our area is carrying some nice free standing stoves now. That one at the hunting camp has worked out well over the years and was priced right at $150. You could line it with firebrick also to probably help hold heat through the night- I don't know why we never did that....
    Does having firebrick increase the heat inside? I'm curious if that would be a danger to the average woodstove?
    Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children's children what it was once like in the United States where men were free.

    Ronald Wilson Reagan (1911-2004)

    JOSEPH WAS A PREPPER!
    NOAH WAS A PREPPER!
    I'M A PREPPER TOO!

  8. #8
    No, but on a really THIN metal unit- such as the cheaper Vogelzang box type stoves (what we have at our hunting camp), the fire burns really hot but seems to not hold heat long.

    I.e, you've been burning for hours, your fixing to go to bed so you add more wood. It's crazy hot for an hour or so but 4 hours into the night it's freezing.

    The thinner metal ones don't have the "mass" effect of a larger or more expensive stove.

    What you want is something with that "mass" that will hold heat and let is slowly release during the night.

    For example, it was 39 here last night so we had that Bunbaker going from about 4pm yesterday. I last put wood in it about 2:30 am I guess while checking on a batch of puppies we have going right now. The house is still very toasty at 73. Last night an hour or so before we went to bed it was 79 degrees.

    My thought on the Vogelzang box stove was that you couldn't really add "mass" to the metal but you could add some firebrick and that might act in a similar fashion. It definitely wouldn't hurt anything. That thin metal can get REALLY hot and almost glow at times. The firebrick would help protect the thinner metal of the Vogelzang if nothing else.

    Better to have a stove that warms up a little slower but KEEPS the warmth longer IMO. It will slowly release that heat over the night while you are sleeping and avoid the getting out of bed every couple hours to stoke the fire trips.
    Boris- "He's famous, has picture on three dollar bill!"

    Rocky- "Wow! I've never even seen a three dollar bill!"

    Boris- "Is it my fault your poor?"

  9. #9
    Right now we have:
    *camp stoves
    *we cook with propane - BUT on my new stove, the oven doesn't work if you don't have electricity, so I am thinking about keeping the one we pulled out of this house and using it as an "outside" stove for canning and a back-up in the event we don't have electricity. We try to keep the tank as full as possible and we have a few twenty pound tanks stocked
    *propane grill
    *several ricks of seasoned wood, but no wood stove We would love to have a wood stove, but can't quite figure out where to put one in this house.

  10. #10
    WILL
    Guest
    Here's a link to an interesting up-n-coming cooling option...
    http://www.cultureunplugged.com/play...ainable-Fridge

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