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  1. #1

    How much med supplies should we be stocking???

    I think that many people don't realize exactly how much medical supplies we may go through in a post SHTF world.. Lots of us stock bandages,gauze,tape etc. but I have a feeling most of us don't properly comprehend the MOUNTAIN of supplies that get used even for basic extended wound care much less prolonged care. Heaven forbid you have to deal with multiple cases of dysentery or cholera. Im talking rolled gauze by the bucket load, bed pads, gloves by the case, sterile saline for wound irrigation, cleaning supplies, bed pans, not to mention bedding and all the supplies needed for handling human waste and hygiene on and on it goes.. Medical pros kick in here. Emt's, nurses or any one with any kind of advanced experience in this field. Ever had more than one member of your family with a bad flu AT THE SAME TIME?? imagine that magnified with all the other stresses you may have to deal with just trying to survive.. Not pleasant to think about for sure but that is a very real possibility..

  2. #2
    Gloves rot over time especially in extremes which will become the norm after no or sporadic power I made that mistake early on. Some things like many liquids can go bad so only so much can be done in areas. The rest is like everything else I work on it like the steak one bite at a time and try to keep a balance between it and everything else that needs storage and purchasing.
    Knowledge is Power, Practiced Knowledge is Strength, Tested Knowledge is Confidence

  3. #3
    agreed but knowing this we should be taking measures to deal with these known storage issues. Just because it is difficult doesnt mean we shouldnt do it. Chlorine can be stored and just because gloves rot doesnt mean we cant increase our stores of other basic supplies.. how long will iodine last? what about sealed containers of alcohol?? or learning to distill other alcohol? How about just having the ability to clean improvised bandages??

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Patriotic Sheepdog's Avatar
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    Okay, I'll chime in with my two cents...

    Bandages of all types-as many as you can store
    Small bandages should be stocked more as most things will be small, cuts, scraps, etc. It wouldn't hurt to have several hundred or thousands of bandaids depending on group size.
    Antibiotic creams-Bacitracin, Neosporin, Polysporin. I prefer Polysporin and bacitracin. Neomycin, the main ingredient in Neosporin was the allergen of the year a few years back. I see new neomycin allergies almost on a weekly basis. Store more than you think you'll need.
    HALO, Aschermans, etc., for tension pneumothorax. This is a hard one as location will play a big role. If you're more urban, then you may see more firefights. If you live on a farm ten miles from your nearest neighbor, not so much.
    Sutures-get many and learn the techniques. May want some anesthesia as well.
    Dental supplies-yep, get some
    Splints-sprains/strains and potential fractures. Get some SAM splints and learn how to use them.
    Antibiotics-yep, get some
    IV fluids and supplies-you should have some as it can be used for many problems besides trauma...severe dehydration is just one that may be present due to diarrhea, or prolonged vomiting. Learn how to start IVs and when and how to monitor your patient.
    Advil, Tylenol, Benadryl, etc. Get as much as you can.

    Bottom line I guess is get what you can and keep stocking med supplies. Learn how and when to use them. You may need more supplies than someone else due to your situation, location and group size. There will be many people that are not in shape or never really used that chainsaw that will be getting injured. Remember, what we consider minor today could be major tomorrow if there is no ER. Set up guidelines for your group such as no one goes barefoot outside, when operating a chainsaw or climbing a ladder a spotter will be present, etc. Prevention will be key.

    Just some thoughts on the fly. If I think of anything else, I'll add it later.


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  5. #5
    Super Moderator Patriotic Sheepdog's Avatar
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    Just something to think about...we won't have this...
    ImageUploadedByTapatalk HD1369580407.819904.jpg


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    Protecting the sheep from the wolves that want them, their family, their money and full control of our Country!

    Guns and gear are cool, but bandages stop the bleeding!

    ATTENTION: No trees or animals were harmed in any way in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were really ticked off!

    NO 10-289!

  6. #6
    2015 Silver Site supporter Rmplstlskn's Avatar
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    The movie I saw recently, The IMPOSSIBLE, shows a good example of disaster triage in hospitals overrun with injured... If you can do most things yourself, just short of surgery, you would be much better off... But as PS posted above, not many can prepare to do real surgery on a patient messed up as the guy in the pic... That guy would die in a PAW...
    -=> Rmplstlskn <=-

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Patriotic Sheepdog's Avatar
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    I have a feeling there will be many deaths from stupid stuff in a PAW situation. When I say stupid I mean stuff that with a little prep work things could be different. Tetanus from a puncture wound, diarrhea like I said above, exposure (heat and cold) injuries, head injuries (external lacerations not internal bleeds) from falls, knife cuts (both self inflicted and from an aggressor) and severe infections from simple scrapes/lacerations would be some that with the proper medical supplies the outcomes could be good.

    Bandages, topical antibiotics, oral antibiotics, IV supplies, medical training and prevention plans are some things you should be prepping/planning for.

    Of course gunshot wounds are another story.


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  8. #8
    2015 Silver Site supporter Rmplstlskn's Avatar
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    I have always weighted my prep spending more heavily on the medical supplies side, for it is one area that is not easily fudged or adaptable, if you want sterility and minimal risk of infections, but it is also one of the most costly, and I am always looking for bargains and closeouts of medical supplies. The pictures of the people in the tornadoes path in OK, as well as first hand witness from many members here of the medical injuries, it has indeed re-motivated me to be aware of items and to replace items I am running low on as I pull from kits over the years for various boo-boo's...

    Thanks for the reminder to be vigilant, PS...
    -=> Rmplstlskn <=-

  9. #9
    a while back my wife was sick with a virus.. purging from both ends.. not pretty.. she became so short on electrolytes she passed out and hit her head.. the next 24 hours of here in the hospital was hell to witness and we were surrounded by trained , skilled professionals with the best gear and plenty of supplies.. It occurred to me then while I was there with here in the emergency room that we don't stock NEARLY enough medical supplies.. When someone is loosing fluids at the rate she was it becomes VERY scary.. it took them almost 12 hours to get her stabilized in the ER. She was on every IV you could imagine.. Post event... SHE WOULD HAVE DIED!!! without that level of medical care,, she would have died.. I need to get to that level of medical proficiency.. IV therapy is not magic, we can all gain this level of skill.. I suggest you do... I KNOW I WILL!!

  10. #10
    wow. That's really something to think about. I'd better work on this area.

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