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  1. #11
    Highest I've ever seen cows in water is where it is just over their backs. I would assume they cannot go any further or swim due to their size, however I've been wrong before LOL.

    The ground under foot (hoof) there is also mushy, which is another reason I never figured they would venture far out there in the first place. Our biggest heifer probably goes up to my chest, so the last panel in the water access point being up to my nose is probably good? Or not?

    Just know I shouldn't have taught them how to build poncho rafts... LOL

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  2. #12
    These cows have been a constant source of both learning and entertainment for us since we started with them. They are extremely intelligent animals and respond well to training. My girl Brownie, aka "Brown Town" is one of the three that eats "cattle cube" treats right out of my hands. I pretty much hugged her tonight. She is the only one I've noticed that was not previously de horned or polled. Thank God the girl is our tamest heifer, she got some little nubs there that one day might be a problem.

    As in real life, the ones that seem to have the most issues are the smaller cows with the "little man" (little heifer) issue. The two little ones- "Cookie" and "Oreo" were having a head butting and pushing contest tonight while I was mowing. Meanwhile the bigger cows were like "yeah whatever, let the kids play..." LOL.

    They are very likable animals, we are learning a lot about them.

    Splitting up one field into three divisions for pasture rotation. Posts in, some dirt moving to be done, but 80% done on that. I've seen them selectively eating here and there, so I understand the need for the rotational grazing via the smaller "slices" to use up an area and then move them on.

    I believe I severely UNDER estimated the carrying capacity of the pasture. New ventures are like that, you LEARN a helluva lot early on. Making money off of them is still years out, it's all about learning now. Heck, surplus MEAT is about 2 year out now as well. But when it comes, I'll know it's clean, doesn't have the "ninja" and I'll know it's tender from being raised as stress free as possible.

    Meanwhile my fields are getting fertilized and mowed and I'm learning some new animal husbandry skills. That's a win/win for me.

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  3. #13
    Gold Site Supporter 2014 thank you! 610Alpha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowdown3 View Post
    These cows have been a constant source of both learning and entertainment for us since we started with them. They are extremely intelligent animals and respond well to training. My girl Brownie, aka "Brown Town" is one of the three that eats "cattle cube" treats right out of my hands. I pretty much hugged her tonight. She is the only one I've noticed that was not previously de horned or polled. Thank God the girl is our tamest heifer, she got some little nubs there that one day might be a problem.

    As in real life, the ones that seem to have the most issues are the smaller cows with the "little man" (little heifer) issue. The two little ones- "Cookie" and "Oreo" were having a head butting and pushing contest tonight while I was mowing. Meanwhile the bigger cows were like "yeah whatever, let the kids play..." LOL.

    They are very likable animals, we are learning a lot about them.

    Splitting up one field into three divisions for pasture rotation. Posts in, some dirt moving to be done, but 80% done on that. I've seen them selectively eating here and there, so I understand the need for the rotational grazing via the smaller "slices" to use up an area and then move them on.

    I believe I severely UNDER estimated the carrying capacity of the pasture. New ventures are like that, you LEARN a helluva lot early on. Making money off of them is still years out, it's all about learning now. Heck, surplus MEAT is about 2 year out now as well. But when it comes, I'll know it's clean, doesn't have the "ninja" and I'll know it's tender from being raised as stress free as possible.

    Meanwhile my fields are getting fertilized and mowed and I'm learning some new animal husbandry skills. That's a win/win for me.

    It sounds like you are learning to be a soil farmer

    Greg Judy is using a breed that started in Alabama. South Poll - The Southern Mama Cow Breed. South Poll Grass Cattle Association. www.southpoll.com

    Did you check out Greg Judy's or Joel Salatin's books?
    "If you will live like no one else, later on you can live like no one else." -- Dave Ramsey

  4. #14
    Gold Site Supporter 2014 thank you! 610Alpha's Avatar
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    Here is a video of Greg Judy this summer talking about how he operates.
    "If you will live like no one else, later on you can live like no one else." -- Dave Ramsey

  5. #15
    Good video.

    Doing similar here just without daily movements, four divisions currently. Just figuring out stocking rates. Been a wet year and we have a low stocking rate now. One smaller field has not even been used yet. We are going to try some rye/rye grass and wheat mix for a winter forage in there a bit also.

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  6. #16
    ld, that was some pretty pix of your place, up there... the place looks real good.

  7. #17
    Gold Site Supporter 2014 thank you! 610Alpha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowdown3 View Post
    Good video.

    Doing similar here just without daily movements, four divisions currently. Just figuring out stocking rates. Been a wet year and we have a low stocking rate now. One smaller field has not even been used yet. We are going to try some rye/rye grass and wheat mix for a winter forage in there a bit also.
    I liked what he had to say about a heavier cow being on wet ground vs a lighter cow.
    "If you will live like no one else, later on you can live like no one else." -- Dave Ramsey

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