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  1. #1

    Improvising for new inverter mount Magnum 4024

    So you might have read me ranting about the Conext 4024 inverter that was less than a year old that went to Helena Handbasket's place. Totally screwed, repairs $200. shy of the cost of a new unit. Old Trace 4024 took dozens of lightning strikes in area and never failed. These newer ones evidently have very little internal protections like the old ones did.

    Replaced with a Magnum 4024 PAE, which is nice cause it also can create 240 volts as well. Do not currently use it for that, but essentially that means I could do more with this unit.

    Reading the manual- yes I am known to do that at times- before install, their was big big warnings about location of installation. They claim in the manual that the inverter can reach temperatures of up to 190 degrees.

    I was more than a little unbelieving in this part, as I've never had an inverter that got really hot during operation. Two previous inverters and 16 years in the same spot with a plywood backing never proved to be a problem. However the manual for the Magnum was very specific so I set out to build a sturdy mount with some offset from the wood wall.

    Lowes had some metal slotted shelving material. Pulling one from the shelf, wedging it into the rack and hanging on it, proved to slowly bend the material. 180 lbs. is a lot more than 60 lbs. so I figured this would hold the inverter well. A mounting bracket was screwed into the wood and the concrete block behind it via Tapcon screws. The slotted hanging brackets were hung from them and further screwed into the wall with Tapcon screws also.

    For more air space to circulate, I mounted screws at the bottom that would keep the base of the inverter off the metal brackets by about an inch and half. The inverter was secured to the bracket assembly near the top via a similar bolt arrangement.

    When it was all in place, I cupped my hands over the top of the inverter on the wall and raised my legs off the ground to check it's strength. Nothing moved so I was happy with the improvised mount Yes I was ready to catch the inverter if need be LOL.

    The Magnum itself is set up slightly different than the Conext was, but the wire connections were easy. The Mrs. **** a couple of the AC1 in (from generator) connections while I was making some other wiring connections and once mounted, the inverter was up and running in no time.

    Will post more after I get a little more experience with the inverter itself, but at this juncture I'm very happy.

    FWIW, the metal "H" mount that was still on the way from the Conext would have worked to mount the Magnum, but I was very leery of having it that close to the wall after all the warnings in the manual, hence the offset mount. Some pics are below-

    IMG_0684.jpgIMG_0685.jpgIMG_0686.jpg

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    "Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed..."

  2. #2

    Couple of questions on this inverter?

    Noticed it doesn't incorporate a built in AC transfer relay (line/gen).
    Only has one AC input whereas the trace had line/Gen1/
    One of my locations has line power so I use line power with a backup generator and solar for the batteries.

    The other locations use it as genvertor with solar for the batteries. (No commercial line available).

    So if you already have line power available, do you already have a line/gen transfer switch installed?

    What struck me as odd, my trace and Aussies all have a line transfer sw rated at 60 amps, even though the inverter is going to put out the 30amps.
    Just odd they didn't incorporate a 60 amp relay.

    Oh, where's the best price source for these?

    Fill me in?

    Thx,
    John

  3. #3
    It does have an AC1 and AC2 in, we just don't grid tie via the system.

    Evidently the way they sell these now is that they have five or six other "add ons" for things like Automatic generator start, DC switchgear, blah blah blah, all adding a couple hundred each to the bottom line.

    The remote was the only accessory we bought. It should be part of the darn unit IMO.

    Altenergy store and Solarblvd are where you normally get the best prices on stuff like this.

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  4. #4
    Thx,
    it's appreciated.
    I have 6 trace sw4024 but only run 4 w/ 2 spares.
    I ran across some really good deals and put some away.
    I'm trying to look at others for when the traces run out assuming things haven't gone ****e by then.

  5. #5
    Hang on to them! IMO, still a much better inverter than these last two. At least you didn't have to buy as an "add on" all the stuff that came standard on the SW4024.

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    "Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed..."

  6. #6
    no kidding.
    I am greatly appreciative of the fact all that stuff is built in.

    Noticed when Xantrex went out there and tried to corner the entire market by buying every inverter company they could (including Trace) , they started making all the normal stuff OPTIONAL.

    Anyway, thx for the info and heads up

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