JRH Products
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    Shooting distance at night- PVS30

    Anyone who has done a little bit of training with night vision realizes that mounting a PVS14 to a weapon is not the best move.

    Several drawbacks to this-

    1. You have to have the rifle up in your shoulder pocket to get a "look" through the PVS14. This causes arm fatigue. Looks cool in the movies but try it for 15 minutes in the backyard and let me know.
    2. Can create safety issues. Your walking around with your couple other family members or members of your group- aka SHTF patrolling. You are #2 man. You hear a noise and you swing the rifle to get a "look" through the NV and in doing so have flagged/muzzle swept several in your party.

    The final reason why this isn't a good idea is the dirty little secret you won't hear a lot. While the PVS14 is rated to 5.56 the truth is any repeated firing CAN (didn't say will) OVER TIME (i.e, not three rounds one time) damage the tube.

    So for the survivalist/patriot this is a big concern because there won't be any more calling to order a new 14 cause your tube got damaged at that point.

    And for the interim time period, understand that the tube is upwards of 90% of the cost of the system. So you want to protect your tube.

    "But I got a good warranty and..."

    Let me just say it is PLAINLY OBVIOUS to folks that work with Night vision when damage was done via too much recoil. Yes I've had several lie about that over the years- "I never shot it on anything." Yeah right, that's not what the techs are saying.


    So for use with a PVS14 the options for aiming are:

    1. An IR laser on the rifle which becomes the aiming point.

    "But Robert, then I'll have a signature you know, the IR dot and I won't be a super stealthy squirrel operator!"

    Well the realty of firing at night is even with a suppressor, you will ALWAYS HAVE SOME SORT OF SIGNATURE- it's called MUZZLE FLASH.

    When the old SF Vietnam vets took us out in the swamps 30 years ago and taught us to shoot at night, they did so with NOTHING, iron sights, no illumination, etc. One of the guys asked why there was the little 2 inch "fishing" cyalume sticks taped to the center of the target. One of the trainers said "cause at night that's all you might have to aim at." It was to simulate MUZZLE FLASH. And we learned to shoot with iron sights and hit them.

    2. "Passive aiming"

    If your looking to avoid IR laser use this is the better option. This involves the use of super high riser mounts and co witnessing dot sights. I find this easier with a dual tube night vision set like a BNVD but it is doable with a monocular like a PVS14.


    However both of these options aren't really LONG or longER distance options.

    So for long distance we have two options-

    1. A dedicated night vision weapon sight.

    2. A "Clip on" night vision sight.

    The clip on sight offers some advantages in that you mount it in front of your daylight scope- thereby negating the need to be "moving scopes", etc.

    PVS30s are the main drug of choice here. Brand new they run into the $15 to $20,000 range. However Knights Armory does some refurbished units from time to time that they take back from military service. These come in under $6,000. and are the best bang for the buck in clip on devices.

    IMG_4140.jpg


    Here is mine on a Bravo Company rifle with a (cheapie) Primary Arms 1-8 variable power scope. I'm really digging this BOG Death Grip tripod as well. Brushbeater had one of these at a class we went to recently and I really liked the setup and ordered one right after. You could see a lot of applications for this most especially in an urban environment.

    The PVS30 works great and I went out again last night and was banging steel at 200 and 300 yards with it.

    For shooting farther than 200 yards most people will want to move to either a dedicated NV scope or a clip on device. The clip on device offers the most flexibility IMO. Consider also that working in a group setting a group could purchase a PVS30 for use at an OP. Each person as they rotate to OP duty can throw a lever and put the PVS30 on their own rifle in front of their own day scope.


    https://www.jrhenterprises.com/PVS30...s30refurbA.htm

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


    "Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed..."

  2. #2
    IMG_4178.jpg

    She's might heavy now, but she goes the distance!!!

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


    "Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed..."

  3. #3
    Heavy?

    The reward is well worth the weight.

    IMHO

  4. #4
    going off track a little when i heard "heavy" so a little short story...
    associate was part of a group of soldiers, in a military competition. being graded on many areas of military activity... they were doing very well. competition carried lots of bragging rights/status etc...
    then it got time for medical/safety test...
    monitor pointed to associate and said "you are injured" and pointed at another soldier and said something to the effect of "check him out"
    associate hit the ground hurt... other soldier leaned over and started checking limbs and airway and other measures. other soldier still had rifle on shoulder with myles targeting gear (very heavy) attached. as other checked associate rifle came off other's shoulder and fell on associates forehead. blood gushed. other soldier's body was hiding the bleeding from monitor...
    other soldier grabbed up rifle as quickly as possible, tried to stop the blood, and continue the exam and not let monitor see what had happened. wasted effort. but he called out. alerting all that associate was "really hurt" associate laying still trying not to over react knowing that whole groups score was dependent on monitor and associates injury...

    you guessed it.. associates group had a pile of excellent scores and one F-
    associate got a huge bandage on forehead and medic instructed no helmet/cover for you...
    so associate rejoined group for competition with big white "flag" on his forehead drawing serious undesired attention.

    lesson, don't drop something heavy and "edged" on your forehead! or your patrol teammate!

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by rockriver View Post
    going off track a little when i heard "heavy" so a little short story...
    associate was part of a group of soldiers, in a military competition. being graded on many areas of military activity... they were doing very well. competition carried lots of bragging rights/status etc...
    then it got time for medical/safety test...
    monitor pointed to associate and said "you are injured" and pointed at another soldier and said something to the effect of "check him out"
    associate hit the ground hurt... other soldier leaned over and started checking limbs and airway and other measures. other soldier still had rifle on shoulder with myles targeting gear (very heavy) attached. as other checked associate rifle came off other's shoulder and fell on associates forehead. blood gushed. other soldier's body was hiding the bleeding from monitor...
    other soldier grabbed up rifle as quickly as possible, tried to stop the blood, and continue the exam and not let monitor see what had happened. wasted effort. but he called out. alerting all that associate was "really hurt" associate laying still trying not to over react knowing that whole groups score was dependent on monitor and associates injury...

    you guessed it.. associates group had a pile of excellent scores and one F-
    associate got a huge bandage on forehead and medic instructed no helmet/cover for you...
    so associate rejoined group for competition with big white "flag" on his forehead drawing serious undesired attention.

    lesson, don't drop something heavy and "edged" on your forehead! or your patrol teammate!
    This is one of the reasons one of the transition to pistol sling drills I teach involves clearing the rifle completely where it is completely on the back over the head and shoulder. That one is used for
    1. Total failure of the rifle- hands cleared for pistol.
    2. Needing both hands free without the rifle bouncing about on the front of the body- most importantly for MOVING A WOUNDED PERSON. With the rifle solidly stuck on the back, the chances of the muzzle knocking into the patient is greatly reduced.

    Downside of course is the rifle is slower to recover.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


    "Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed..."

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •